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Medicine in modern society

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Published by Princeton University Press in Princeton .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Medicine -- History.,
  • Medicine.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementDavid Riesman.
SeriesVanuxem lectures ;, 1938.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsR133 .R53 1938
The Physical Object
Pagination226 p. ;
Number of Pages226
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6383611M
LC Control Number39005379
OCLC/WorldCa1574391

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The social history of medicine over the past fifteen years has redrawn the boundaries of medical history. Specialized papers and monographs have contributed to our knowledge of how medicine has affected society and how society has shaped medicine. This book synthesizes, through a series of essays, some of the most significant findings of this "new social history" of s: 2.   Medicine has made huge strides in the last years. Antibiotics, antiseptic, and vaccines are relatively recent inventions, and yet scientists are .   In Modern Death, Dr. Haider Warraich says a slow dying process, during which patients move in and out of hospitals or nursing homes, is a "very recent development in our history as a species.". The essays provide an accessible introduction to the subject, setting nineteenth and early twentieth-century medicine in its political, cultural, intellectual and economic contexts. Medicine transformed is complemented by a companion volume of primary and secondary readings: Health, disease and society in Europe, A source book.

Sharp, bold and engaging, this book provides a contemporary account of why medical sociology matters in our modern society. Combining theoretical and empirical perspectives, and applying the pragmatic demands of policy, this timely book explores society's response to key issues such as race, gender and identity to explain the relationship between sociology, medicine and medical sociology. The Slumbering Masses is a fascinating account of the ordering and disordering of sleep as an institutional and individual phenomenon in modern America. Wolf-Meyer brings us into the lives of people struggling—at work, at home, and in clinics—to align their nights and days with the abstract demands of sleep as a biomedical form and social norm. "In an era of rapidly emerging diseases, Epidemics and Society reminds us that in framing epidemics we are also, always, refiguring human life and fate in relation to ecology and society."—Warwick Anderson, author of Colonial Pathologies: American Tropical Medicine, Race, and Hygiene in the Philippines.   An American Obsession: Science, Medicine and Homosexuality in Modern Society. By Jennifer Terry (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, xiv plus pp.). Jennifer Terry's 'An American Obsession is a work of breathtaking scholarship and gravitas.

Medicine is the science and practice of establishing the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of ne encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of porary medicine applies biomedical sciences, biomedical research, genetics, and medical technology to diagnose, treat, and prevent.   How World War I Influenced the Evolution of Modern Medicine soldiers and send them home as functioning members of society. Occupational . Science, Technology, Medicine and Society Scientific research and technological developments can have powerful effects on individuals' lives and society's ways of providing services. For example, new knowledge in genetics is changing the way we think about risk of illness, kinship, and the ability to intervene in biological processes to change. The history of medicine shows how societies have changed in their approach to illness and disease from ancient times to the present. Early medical traditions include those of Babylon, China, Egypt and India. Sushruta, from India, introduced the concepts of medical diagnosis and Hippocratic Oath was written in ancient Greece in the 5th century BCE, and is a direct inspiration for.